Product Marketing

Pitching Product

What is Pitching Product?
Definition of Pitching Product
Skillfully pitching new products or incremental features into internal executive committees requires disciplined preparation succinctly tailoring and dynamically conveying product value proposition claims credibly resonating with each audience of fortune 500 leaders or external venture constituencies. It involves artfully weaving targeted insight narratives, crisp financial projections and subtle yet persuasive experience differentiators customized specifically per audience and selling situation ultimately seeking convey confidence long term gains offset adoption risks or incremental resource requirements require upfront.

In the realm of business and entrepreneurship, the term "Pitching Product" refers to the act of presenting or proposing a product to potential investors, customers, or stakeholders. This process is a critical component of product management and operations, as it directly impacts the product's marketability and profitability. The art of pitching a product involves a deep understanding of the product, its market, and the needs of the potential customers or investors.

The process of pitching a product is not a one-size-fits-all approach. It varies depending on the nature of the product, the target audience, and the specific goals of the pitch. Despite these variations, the fundamental principles of a successful product pitch remain the same: clear communication, compelling storytelling, and a strong understanding of the product and its market.

Product Pitching: An Overview

A product pitch is a presentation or proposal that aims to persuade potential customers, investors, or stakeholders to buy, invest in, or support a product. The pitch typically includes information about the product's features, benefits, and unique selling points, as well as data and evidence to support these claims.

The goal of a product pitch is not just to inform, but to convince. It's about making a compelling case for why the product is worth buying or investing in. This involves not only presenting the facts about the product, but also telling a story that connects with the audience's needs, desires, and emotions.

Types of Product Pitches

Product pitches can take many forms, depending on the context and the audience. Some common types of product pitches include sales pitches, investor pitches, and internal pitches.

Sales pitches are directed at potential customers and focus on the product's features, benefits, and value proposition. Investor pitches, on the other hand, are aimed at potential investors and focus on the product's market potential, financial projections, and return on investment. Internal pitches are made within an organization, often to secure approval, resources, or support for a product.

Principles of Effective Product Pitching

While the specific content and structure of a product pitch may vary, there are several key principles that underpin effective product pitching. These principles serve as a guide for creating and delivering a compelling product pitch.

Firstly, a good product pitch is clear and concise. It communicates the key points about the product and its value proposition in a way that is easy to understand and remember. Secondly, a good product pitch is customer-focused. It speaks to the needs and desires of the audience, and shows how the product can meet these needs or desires. Finally, a good product pitch is persuasive. It uses evidence, logic, and emotion to convince the audience of the product's worth.

Clarity and Conciseness

Clarity and conciseness are crucial in a product pitch. The audience should be able to quickly and easily understand what the product is, what it does, and why it's valuable. This requires a clear and concise presentation of the product's features, benefits, and unique selling points.

One way to achieve clarity and conciseness is to use simple, straightforward language. Avoid jargon and technical terms that the audience may not understand. Instead, use plain language that the audience can easily comprehend. Also, keep the pitch short and to the point. A long, rambling pitch can lose the audience's attention and dilute the impact of the message.

Customer Focus

A customer-focused pitch is one that speaks directly to the needs and desires of the audience. It shows how the product can solve a problem, meet a need, or fulfill a desire that the audience has. This requires a deep understanding of the audience and their needs, desires, and pain points.

To create a customer-focused pitch, start by identifying the audience's needs, desires, and pain points. Then, show how the product can address these needs, desires, or pain points. Use examples, stories, and evidence to make this connection clear and compelling. Finally, make sure to highlight the benefits of the product, not just its features. The audience wants to know what the product can do for them, not just what it can do.

Steps in Pitching a Product

Pitching a product is a process that involves several steps. These steps include researching the audience, crafting the pitch, practicing the pitch, delivering the pitch, and following up after the pitch. Each of these steps is critical to the success of the product pitch.

The first step in pitching a product is to research the audience. This involves understanding who the audience is, what their needs and desires are, and how the product can meet these needs and desires. The more you know about the audience, the better you can tailor the pitch to their needs and desires.

Researching the Audience

Researching the audience is a crucial first step in pitching a product. This involves understanding who the audience is, what their needs and desires are, and how the product can meet these needs and desires. The more you know about the audience, the better you can tailor the pitch to their needs and desires.

There are several ways to research the audience. You can conduct surveys or interviews, analyze market data, or use customer feedback and reviews. The goal is to gain a deep understanding of the audience's needs, desires, and pain points, so you can show how the product can address these needs, desires, or pain points.

Crafting the Pitch

Once you have a clear understanding of the audience, the next step is to craft the pitch. This involves creating a compelling narrative that communicates the key points about the product and its value proposition. The pitch should be clear, concise, customer-focused, and persuasive.

The pitch should start with a strong opening that grabs the audience's attention and sets the tone for the rest of the pitch. This could be a surprising fact, a provocative question, or a compelling story. The pitch should then present the product's features, benefits, and unique selling points, using evidence, logic, and emotion to convince the audience of the product's worth. The pitch should end with a strong closing that reinforces the key points and calls the audience to action.

Examples of Successful Product Pitches

There are many examples of successful product pitches that can serve as inspiration and guidance. These examples demonstrate the principles and steps of effective product pitching in action.

One famous example is the initial pitch for the original iPhone by Steve Jobs in 2007. Jobs did not just present the features of the iPhone; he told a story about how the iPhone was a revolutionary product that would change the way people use phones. He used clear and simple language, focused on the benefits of the iPhone, and used evidence and emotion to make a compelling case for the iPhone.

iPhone Pitch by Steve Jobs

The initial pitch for the original iPhone by Steve Jobs in 2007 is a classic example of a successful product pitch. Jobs did not just present the features of the iPhone; he told a story about how the iPhone was a revolutionary product that would change the way people use phones.

Jobs started the pitch with a strong opening, declaring that the day was a day that Apple was going to reinvent the phone. He then presented the features of the iPhone, but not in a dry, technical way. Instead, he demonstrated the features in action, showing how they would benefit the user. He used clear and simple language, avoided jargon, and focused on the benefits, not just the features. He also used evidence and emotion to make a compelling case for the iPhone, showing videos of people using the iPhone and expressing his own passion and excitement for the product.

Tesla Pitch by Elon Musk

Another example of a successful product pitch is the pitch for the Tesla Model S by Elon Musk in 2012. Musk did not just present the features of the Model S; he told a story about how the Model S was a game-changing product that would revolutionize the auto industry.

Musk started the pitch with a strong opening, declaring that the Model S was not just the best electric car, but the best car, period. He then presented the features of the Model S, but not in a dry, technical way. Instead, he demonstrated the features in action, showing how they would benefit the user. He used clear and simple language, avoided jargon, and focused on the benefits, not just the features. He also used evidence and emotion to make a compelling case for the Model S, showing videos of the Model S in action and expressing his own passion and excitement for the product.

Conclusion

In conclusion, pitching a product is a critical component of product management and operations. It involves presenting a product to potential customers, investors, or stakeholders, with the goal of persuading them to buy, invest in, or support the product. The process of pitching a product involves several steps, including researching the audience, crafting the pitch, practicing the pitch, delivering the pitch, and following up after the pitch. By following these steps and adhering to the principles of effective product pitching, you can create and deliver a compelling product pitch that resonates with your audience and achieves your goals.

Whether you're pitching a product to customers, investors, or stakeholders, the key to a successful product pitch is to make a compelling case for why the product is worth buying or investing in. This requires a deep understanding of the product, its market, and the needs of the potential customers or investors. With this understanding, you can craft a pitch that is clear, concise, customer-focused, and persuasive, and that tells a compelling story about the product and its value proposition.